CEO’s 2021 Easter Message

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Good Day Castle Friends

I bring you this update with a healthy mixture of emotions:  On the one hand, there is optimism that the roll-out of the Covid-19 vaccines will steer us towards some form of normality, especially in our tourism and hospitality sector, which is showing moderate signs of recovery.  On the other hand, the structural, political, and other weaknesses in the global vaccination roll-out regimes coupled with talks of a third wave are dampening our spirits.  But let us never despair: humanity faced and overcame even the worst trials and tribulations.


President Cyril Ramaphosa and the Minister of Defence
& Military Veterans, Nosiviwe Mapisa-Nqakula's,
visit to the Castle of Good Hope on 21 February 2021.

Human Rights Month 2021

As we approach Human Rights Day in South Africa (21 March), we are reminded of the sacrifices of millions of women, men, and children to improve others' rights.  Our Constitution has a special section, the Bill of Rights, focusing on our inalienable rights like freedom of expression, movement, religion, association and many others. But we need to be brutally frank with ourselves: how much did we (you and I) do to ensure that these rights are equitably and fairly applied to all 58 million inhabitants of our beautiful land?

Here at South Africa's Castle of Good Hope, I must remind you of the human rights atrocities committed in the name of past oppressive systems like colonialism, slavery, and apartheid; the legacies still clearly visible in towns and townships surrounding us.

Easter Season 2021: Stay Safe. Stay Healthy. Stay alive.

The Easter holiday season, traditionally a family affair was severely disrupted by the pandemic last year.  It is up to every responsible citizen to avoid the calamity this year.  Third-wave or not, let us practice the health and safety protocols as a matter of principle and save lives.  We owe it to humanity in this month of human rights.

When you visit the Castle, the permanent and temporary exhibitions and collections that carry the coming season's messages are at your disposal.  The William Fehr, Secunde House, Military Museum, Cape Muslim Heritage Art, Ceramic, Posterity, and Rhino poaching exhibitions echo the greed, selfishness, and general disrespect for the other.  But these exhibitions also carry stories of resilience, heroism, and hope – vital ingredients required during today's trying times.  Please engage with the collections and feedback your invaluable comments. They mean a lot to us.

Opening Soon: The Camissa Museum at the Castle

We are currently putting the final touches on arguably one of the most significant permanent exhibitions in decades, the Camissa Museum. The following excerpt from the Camissa Prospectus (2020) sums up the project:

"The Camissa Project's objectives are to inform all South African communities about history and heritage they know little about because unhealthy friction and even violence have come to dominate relations between Camissa Africans and other African communities. In some ways, this is a peace-building project as much as it is about the restoration of memory, leading to restorative justice. Teachers and school pupils, students, and the general public will find the museum exhibition and challenges exposed to be fascinating and enhance inter-community discourse in South Africa. It will also contribute to healing and finding African unity. It will also expose white South Africans to many contradictions within their history of the Cape and South Africa and contribute to understanding and healing. For the tourist community, for the first time, they may better understand the history and peopling of the Cape."

I am indeed looking forward to the opening of this virtual museum in the next month or so. Watch this space.

Stay safe, healthy, and hopeful.

Castle Greetings...

Chief Executive - Castle Control Board

 

South African Museums Association

Recommended Norms & Standards
For The Operating of Museums
During COVID-19

08 July 2020

- Click here to view the document -

#Youngcreatives: Self Exploration Through Photographic Expression

12th September 2018.

Artistic expression comes forth in many forms, be it through dancing, singing, writing and drawing – it lives and its breathes. Cape Town has become renowned for its artistic expression through up and coming artists who express themselves through their art work, exploring narratives behind it.
Photography is one such art form which does just that. It changes the way in which you view reality and the things you may overlook. It expresses sadness, joy, beauty and depth through a focused lens.

In early August, Earl Abrahams and Wandie Mesatywa, second residency photographers of Amplify Studio in Cape Town were featured in a residency photographic exhibition titled, My Identity which explored these young, talented South African photographer’s identities.

Abrahams’ project, Coloured In, explored spatial and racial segregation passed on through the Group Areas Act under the Apartheid Regime, which gave way to exploration of his identity and community.
Mesatywa’s project, Iqhiya captured the beauty of Iqhiya, also known as the doek or head wrap, declaring her pride in being a Xhosa woman.

Here, Abrahams and Mesatywa share with us what the project meant to them, their love of photography and their plans moving forward.

 

Can you tell us more about what this project meant to you as an individual?

Abrahams: My project ‘Coloured In’ was a deeply personal and explorative one that forced me to confront myself and my identity as a so called ‘coloured man’. It steered me into a reflective space, forcing me to ask really hard questions about my community, people, space and current state of the City in which I had lived for so long.

     

Photography by Earl Abrahams.

 

My project allowed me to pause for a moment, to tackle issues in my head and heart – and I feel that ‘Coloured In’ has given me the foundations to continue creating…

Mesatywa: The project meant I had to open up to strangers and people I already know. And that was hard for me. I am a private person and I like my own space. This project opened room for people to interrogate me, my beliefs, and the culture I was born into. It has certainly brought me closer to my inner self…

 

In which ways has the project amplified your own identity?

Abrahams: It has amplified my own identity through granting me clarity of understanding of my own views and the views of those around me in relation to our community spaces and their challenges. The understanding of how complex and increasingly involved it would be to dismantle the inculcated systems that still reign within society today.

Mesatywa: I wouldn’t say amplified but it made me more aware of how further away I am to my true identity as a Xhosa speaking person. In relation to and with my culture. So the venture to self-exploration continues until my identity is amplified:).

 

What has it meant to you to be a part of the Amply Studio’s residency photographic exhibition?

Abrahams: It has truly been an honour to be a part of the Amplify residency programme/exhibition. This programme has given me the opportunity to develop as an artist and has given me a clearer focus of my future artistic endeavours.

Mesatywa: It meant breaking boundaries in the industry of art as a professional and recent graduate. As well as not conforming to expectations but realising the true potential of what I could achieve as an artist and a black young woman.

 

Photography by Wandie Mesatywa.

 

Has photography always been a passion of yours? What is it about this art form that you love?

Abrahams: Inline skating was always my first love/passion (and I’ve been inline skating for more than 20 years). I got introduced to photography through inline skating and I generally only use to engage with it in that space. It is only within the last four years that I decided to venture out of the confines of the inline skating world and develop a new found love and passion for the story telling prowess that photography gives me access to.

What I love about this art form is that it allows me the freedom to share my worldview with others – I also love the diversity that photography offers – whether it be street, wildlife, fashion, conceptual photography – this art form has room for anyone and everyone.

Mesatywa: It is hard to say that it has always been a passion of mine, as it was a strange finding – when I realised it was something I loved, it was more of the freedom it gave me and satisfaction that I fell in love with. Only later I started appreciating and loving the artistic side of it.

 

What are your plans moving forward? Are there any other projects and/ or exhibitions that you’re currently involved in/ planning?

Abrahams: I’ve recently relocated up to Johannesburg, so I plan to showcase the work in Jozi before the end of the year. I also have a part two of Coloured In that I have started working on and will hopefully be showcasing this body of work sometime next year. I’ve also started a new video series called TALK which showcases various individuals in the creative and other industries.

Mesatywa: I plan on producing more work around the same theme of identity. I am also involved in a group exhibition We Cannot Be Silent, which is currently showing at the Castle of Good Hope until 24 September. I am also part of a group show launching in September at Everard Read Gallery at the V&A Waterfront, as well as another group show in Hamburg, Germany also launching in September.

 

Do you have any message for those exploring their own artistic creativity or expression?

Abrahams: Believe in yourself and your abilities – start your own projects, even if you don’t have everything mapped out yet. You’ll be amazed at how a concept can lead you to other opportunities. Most importantly, tell your story – it’s those stories that have the ability to shift perspectives and help others to believe in themselves.

Mesatywa: Staying true to who you are is what adds depth and authenticity to one’s creativity. Therefore, I would say never lose touch with who you.

Abrahams and Mesatywa’s photography exhibits at Amplify Studios until the end of September.

Bizcommunity 

SA Tourism Services Association
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Tourism Industry Standard Protocols
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Updated Lockdown
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Answering your questions on filming procedures during COVID-19 lock down.

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An infographic with tips and emergency contact numbers.

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Latest Events

To see the latest upcoming events at the Castle of Good Hope, click on a day or the month title to display the event(s).

April 2021
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Key Ceremony

TIMES
10:00|12:00 

This showcases the unlocking of the Van der Stel entrance of the Castle of Good Hope by the ceremonial guards of the castle. It is a past practice that is still practised today.

Canon Firing

TIMES
10:00|11:00|12:00 

The firing of the signal cannon was used to indicate that a ship had been sighted at sea and to relay the message to people inside the fort. You can view the firing of an old cannon, performed by the Cannon Association of South Africa.

Guided Tours

TIMES
11:00|12:00|14:00|15:00|16:00 

Unearth the hidden history of the Castle with a guided tour led by an experienced guide. Tours operate seven days a week.

 

Please note that the Key Ceremony, Cannon Firing & Guided Tour activities have been suspended due to COVID-19 protocols at this time.

 

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